Title

Attitudes and perceptions toward telehealth: racial differences

Date of Award

12-1-2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master Of Arts In Clinical Psychology

Colleges & School

College Of Arts And Sciences

First Advisor

Lela Joscelyn, PhD

Library of Congress Subject Heading

Medical telematics--Attitudes; Ethnic attitudes

Abstract

This study examined the attitudes and perceptions members of the dominant racial groups in the United States hold toward the use of telehealth for medical and mental health services. The study used a convenience sample of 109 participants (54 White, 30 Black, 9 Asian, 9 Hispanic and 7 Mixed). Measures were administered to assess demographic information, as well as the TAQ, a questionnaire designed to survey the attitudes and perceptions participants hold toward telehealth (Grubaugh et al., 2008). The TAQ generated data on level of comfort with teleheath and telepsychiatry, the level of concern about using it and availability to information technologies. The researcher hypothesized significant differences to exist between racial groups; however, overall results did not support this in attitudes and perceptions toward telehealth or access to information services. There was a significant difference in the concerns the groups had about using telehealth (X2 (n = 109) = 9.76, p = .03). This study was preliminary in nature and more research must be done to support any inferences to the larger population.

Rights

On-Campus Access

OCLC Number

824539741.00

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